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I love watching period movies and reading period novels. With the recent surge in steampunk both as a fashion statement and in literature, it has been glorious being able to read more Victorian and Regency fantasy. True steampunk uses technology in a Victorian setting. Think of H.G. Well’s Time Machine or Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Journey to the Center of the Earth. At the era these were written, this was science fiction and until recently it was referred to as classic science fiction. However, one of the fun things about the most recent steampunk novels is that you can have corsets, lacy bloomers and magic too! Since I am not just a writer, but also a fashion designer who sells fascinators and bloomers, this is right up my alley!

My published steampunk short stories include: Lady Chatterley’s Computer, an alternate reality about Lady Chatterley if her lover was a human (Published in Deepwood’s Ancient New Anthology, and the Quantum Mechanic, a story about a mechanic who needs to fix the space/time continuum and ends up in a steampunk universe for a period of time where she meets the love of her life in a different dimension (honorable mention in contest and published in On the Premises). Speed Dating for Books, a short story about a woman who is looking for a book to date, was heavily influenced by Pride and Prejudice though it takes place in modern times. In fact, I probably have five more short stories that feature a magically created, alternate reality or robotic Mr. Darcy on the desks of publishers awaiting the day they will be sold. I might classify these as steampunk but in reality they are Regency-punk.

Below are reviews of some of my favorites steampunk Regency-punk novels. I lean toward romance and humor, but in general I like strong relationship development. As I read more (and more are recommended to me) I hope to make additions to my list. For example, the book Night Circus sounds like the Hunger Games with Victorian magicians and it sounds like something I would enjoy, but I haven’t read it yet.

You think you know the world of magical boarding schools? Not from a teacher’s perspective at a school for at-risk youth.

Clarissa Lawrence lives in a world of talking unicorns, djinn who grant wishes, and sirens who seduce with their voice. But not all magic is rainbows and sunshine. Magic comes with a price, every favor requires one in return, and bargaining with a Fae might cost a witch her soul.

This book is available on Amazon in paperback and ebook formats: 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HVMPF13/

You think you know the world of magical boarding schools? Not from a teacher’s perspective at a school for at-risk youth.

 

Clarissa Lawrence knew there would be a price to pay for accepting the assistance of a Fae’s magic, though she never thought it would cost her heart. . . .

Publication Date: November 1, 2018

 

This book is currently available for preorder on Amazon here:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HVZJWL4

Last month I gave a presentation in Portland at Rose City Romance Writers (RCRW) on the benefits of writing short stories. One might ask why it would benefit you to shift your focus away from novel writing to short story writing. The number one reason is marketing. This is one more way to promote your novels and brand, while honing your craft and learning to write succinctly. Sure, you can continue to write non-fiction blog posts and articles in magazines and sources read by other writers, but stories are another way to reach your fans. Not only that, but you can make money and win contests doing so.

There are many common grammatical mistakes that writers make when submitting manuscripts. Learn how to prevent them with these tips. This blog post focuses on punctuation and quotation marks.

There are many common grammatical mistakes that writers make when submitting manuscripts. Learn how to prevent them with these tips. This blog post focuses on: Hyphens, N-dashes and M-dashes.

A few months ago I presented at the Willamette Writers in Eugene, Oregon and then at Rose City Romance Writer’s Portland chapter of RWA on grammar. Punctuation and quotation marks was one of the topics we covered. When I am copy editing, there are common mistakes I find among writers again and again. If you already know these rules and use them in your own writing correctly, this is an area where you have a strength. If you aren’t aware of a rule, need to look at the examples to answer correctly, or typically use a manual to refresh your memory, this is an area you might want to practice in order to improve.

Learn common grammatical mistakes that writers make when submitting manuscripts and how to prevent them. In this post we focus on: Pronouns, Proper Nouns and Capitalization Problems.

 

A few months ago I presented at the Willamette Writers in Eugene, Oregon and then at Rose City Romance Writer’s Portland chapter of RWA on grammar. When I am copy editing, there are common mistakes I find among writers again and again. If you already know these rules and use them in your own writing correctly, this is an area where you have a strength. If you aren’t aware of a rule, need to look at the examples to answer correctly, or typically use a manual to refresh your memory, this is an area you might want to practice in order to improve.

When we go to a job interview, we wear our best suit, come with a list of references, and might even remember to put on deodorant. At least, we do if we want the job. When we format a manuscript, self-edit a novel, or polish a book before sending it off to an agent or editor, we strive to present it as though we are professional writers who know what we are doing. At least, we do if we want to be published. Whether a seasoned writer, or someone just starting out in the writing process, there are weaknesses we don’t always recognize in our skills. We get into ruts with grammar, formatting, or stylistic “rules” we learned early on in high school writing classes that are bad practices in professional writing. 

Whether a pro at selling short stories or just starting out in the market, it is good to review the tricks of the trade to see if you have been leaving any steps out. Sarina Dorie has sold over 35 short stories to magazines, anthologies and ezines. Many of these are available as free reads and listed in her bio and announcements.

When we go to a job interview, we wear our best suit, come with a list of references, and might even remember to put on deodorant. At least, we do if we want the job. When we format a manuscript, self-edit a novel, or polish a book before sending it off to an agent or editor, we strive to present it as though we are professional writers who know what we are doing. At least, we do if we want to be published. Whether a seasoned writer, or someone just starting out in the writing process, there are weaknesses we don’t always recognize in our skills. We get into ruts with grammar, formatting or stylistic “rules” we learned early on in high school writing classes that are bad practices in professional writing. Learn the common mistakes so you can recognize when you make these in your writing so you can avoid them.

            For the last fourteen years of my life I have been submitting novels to agents and editors. After a couple hundred rejections (per novel), I started to feel frustrated. Okay, maybe I felt frustrated after the first rejection, but for some reason, I kept going. Determined to become a better writer, and tap into a different market, I started writing short stories. Then I started writing short short stories.

The Memory Thief Series is a steampunk series set on a Japanese world. The first novel came out in February. Two more are set to come out later this year. Check back for updates!